Use Metal Roof To Potect Your Roof

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF METAL ROOFING?

Longevity, energy efficiency and a lower environmental impact are just some of the benefits of choosing a metal roof.

Although the initial cost of a metal roof is more than traditional asphalt, so is its lifespan. Metal roofs can last 30 to 50 years longer than other roofing materials, saving you money in the long-term. ) Plus, cool-metal roofing uses a reflective solar coating designed to minimize heat buildup and reduce air conditioning costs. (Another money-saver!)

Every year, about 13.2 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle waste is generated across the United States; making metal an environmentally friendly option to consider. They are also 100% recyclable and are made with a minimum of 25% recycled material, depending on the type of metal.

WHAT ROOFING MATERIAL SHOULD I PICK?

Metal roofs can be manufactured from a variety of metals and alloys including steel, aluminum, copper, zinc and terne (zinc-tin alloy).

Steel:

There are three variations of steel: galvanized, galvalume, and weathering steel (corten). Steel is one of the most common metal roof materials.One reason for its popularity is the varying color options, high strength, low weight and long-term durability. These can allow for a variety of looks to complement your home.

Compared to other metal, steel is typically less expensive. Depending upon the thickness, color, and quality of the desired panels, pricing could range anywhere from $75 to $250 per roofing square (100 square feet).

Steel roofs do have a downside, though. If your home is located along the coast and exposed to salt spray, you may want to rule out galvanized steel – it could corrode in such conditions.

Aluminum:

Aluminum is typically more expensive than steel, but also comes with more resistance. Aluminum sheet metal is very lightweight and easy for a contractor to form and install. Even though aluminum is a thinner and lighter material, it’s still very durable and can replicate the strength of much thicker metals.

One of the biggest selling points of an aluminum roof is the fact that it doesn’t have red rust and corrosion is generally minimal as it ages. Studies have even shown that aluminum can work great in coastal areas with high rainfall and seawater spray conditions. However, aluminum is typically a thinner material and therefore more prone to denting.

Copper:

Copper is long-lasting, known to last up to 100 years. It is very soft, which makes it a quieter option, think heavy rain downpour! However, copper is expensive and over time acquires a greenish patina. Some people find that attractive, but others don’t like the transitioning hues.

Zinc:

Zinc actually possesses its own outer protective layer, which prevents against corrosion, scratching and panel markings. If wind or another element were to scratch the surface of the zinc roof, the metal’s protective layer would actually fix and correct itself over time. Zinc roofs have been known to last anywhere from 60 to 100 years.

 

How to Repair a Hole in a Metal Roof System

Clean the repair area:

The first step in the repair of any metal roofing material will involve cleaning the surface. A hole in a metal roof system can be caused by any number of sources—the hole may be from deterioration and rust, or it may be from something falling onto the roof surface, such as a large branch. No matter what the cause of the hole, the area around the hole is most likely dirty and will require cleaning.

Thoroughly clean the surface of the metal panel using Simple Green or another cleaner, until the surface of the roof panels is completely free of any dirt, film, and algae growth. Any cleaner residue will compromise the integrity of the roof repair.

After cleaning the surface of the metal panel, use a wire brush to scuff the surface where the repair will be made. Scuffing the surface will help the sealant bond to the metal. Use the wire brush only in the area to be patched; wire brushing beyond that may remove the protective coating from the metal panel surface, causing later deterioration.

Measure the repair area and cut a patch:

Cut the chosen sheet metal to a size that matches the area to be patched. The sheet metal patch should overlap onto the metal panel at least two inches past the edges of the damaged area. After the sheet metal patch has been cut and fit to size, round the corners of the patch with a file or emery cloth to prevent any sharp corners from becoming a catching spot for snow or ice.

Once the patch has been measured, place it over the hole being repaired. Take a pencil and outline the patch onto the roofing. Remove the patch and examine the outline to make sure the patch will overlap by at least 2 inches in all directions past the edges of the damaged area.

Install the repair patch:

Apply the color-matched urethane sealant to the surface of the metal panel being repaired, staying just inside the marked pencil line. Apply the sealant liberally in the area, so that there are no gaps or voids at the leading edge of the patch.

Press the patch into place over the damaged area. The sealant should squeeze out from the leading edge of the patch along all sides. If there are areas where the sealant is not oozing, these are areas where moisture may later penetrate under the patch, causing a deterioration of the patch. Apply a little more sealant here to eliminate any gaps.

Variation: holes in raised roofing seams:

If the hole or damage to the roof is in the raised seam between panels rather than in the flat area of a panel, patch it with an asphalt impregnated glass-membrane fabric over the damaged portion of the seam itself. On raised-seam roofs, it is important that the individual panels be allowed to move along the seams, so never attach a metal patch that is anchored to both roofing panels over the seam. Instead, repair the damage to the seam with narrow strips of membrane fabric confined to the raised seam section. The patching strip should overlap the damaged area by at least 2 inches. Over the top of the patching strip, apply a coating of urethane sealant, then another patching strip. Done correctly, both roofing panels will still be able to move independently.

Secure the patch:

Once the patch has been pressed in place, attach it to the surface of the metal roof panel, using pan-head sheet metal screws. Space the screws every three to four inches around the perimeter of the patch. The screws should be applied within one inch of the edges of the patch so that they apply uniform pressure to the edges and to the sealant beneath the patch. The screws should be only long enough to secure the patch to the underlying roofing panel. Never screw the patch down through the roofing panels and into the roof decking or rafters.

As necessary after the patch has been attached, retool any sealant that is bleeding from the edge of the patch, using a putty knife. This will ensure that the sealant properly seals the edges of the patch and prevents moisture from penetrating.

Paint the patch to match the roof:

If desired, the surface of the patch can be painted to match the color of the metal roof panels. To do this, lightly wire-brush the surface of the metal patch and the metal panel just past the edges of the patch. Paint over the surface of the patch and onto the surface of the underlying panel. It may be necessary to wait for the sealant to cure before it will accept paint. Also, confirm that the paint is compatible with the sealant you used.

Safety Considerations

Safety is a major concern when completing any roof repair project. A hole in a roof system may indicate that there are other concerns about the overall structure, including decking deterioration. Be sure to conduct a proper under-deck safety review and roof analysis before attempting to complete this or any roof repair. If there are concerns about completing your roof repair safely, contact a professional roofing contractor who can complete the repair for you in a safe and professional manner.

 

Metal Roofing Drawbacks

Though metal roofing offers many pluses, a few drawbacks are worthy of mention. For the most part, metal roofing manufacturers have improved their products to address or solve many of these concerns:

Metal Roof Cost.

The biggest drawback is initial cost. Metal roofing is equivalent in cost to other premium materials—from about $150 to $600 per square (100 square feet).

Because of the material’s long-term durability, the trick is that you ultimately save the difference (and more) if you stay in the house for a long time and, of course, you save on seasonal maintenance. Then again, if you plan to move in a couple of years, you probably won’t get the return on your investment.

Noise.

For some, the sound of rain tapping on the roof is romantic and homey. For others, it’s like living inside a drum. In a rainstorm or hailstorm, living beneath thin sheets of metal is bound to be noisier than living beneath thick slate or tile. Noise can be controlled both by using materials that have structural barriers to minimize the drumming effect and by applying them over sound-deadening insulation and solid plywood sheathing.

Denting.

Just as your car will dent if a golf ball hits it, a metal roof can dent if large hailstones fall on it. Copper and aluminum roofing, much softer than steel, are more prone to denting. Some types are guaranteed not to dent, however.

Though you shouldn’t have to walk on a roof that doesn’t leak, there may be occasions when a plumber needs to snake out a vent pipe or a chimney sweep needs access to the flue. You can walk on some metal roofs but not all of them. This depends on how the particular product is made and the type of construction supporting it. As you might imagine, metal can be very slippery when wet.

Marring & care.

Some painted metal roof finishes can peel, chip, fade, scratch, or chalk, although nearly all are guaranteed for 30 years. Walking on some types, particularly those with a granulated-stone surface, may cause wear.

Installers must be careful not to scratch or dent the roofing during installation, and panels must be treated with care. Unlike conventional roofing, some metal shingle systems are installed from the top down, eliminating the need to walk on them. Once installed, you may need to hose off roofing now and then to keep it looking good.

Leaking.

A metal roof must be installed correctly. Roofs with exposed fasteners are particularly vulnerable to improper installation. If screws attach through the flat surfaces (rather than the raised ridges), rain water can run down the roof and seep into the screw holes. For this reason, special resilient washes must seal around screw heads. If you install this type of roof, be sure manufacturer’s instructions are followed precisely.

Expansion & contraction.

Because metal expands and contracts as it warms and cools, most new products have fastening systems that accommodate movement. Otherwise, fasteners that secure the roofing may tend to come loose. Expansion and contraction on hot days can cause a wavy affect.

Modifications.

Metal roofing materials installed in large panels are more difficult to replace if damaged than individual shingles. Also, if you remodel or add on to your home 10 or 20 years from now, it may be difficult to match the material.

Lightning.

Many people assume that because metal conducts electricity, it also attracts it. This really isn’t the case, and many instances have been documented where lightning has struck trees or other high objects located near metal roofs rather than the roofs themselves. Just the same, metal roofs can be easily grounded by a lightning protection company.

House fire.

Though metal roofs are good at guarding against a fire that approaches from outside a house (such as from flying sparks and embers), they are not ideal for fires that start inside a house. With a serious house fire, firemen may need to cut through the roof to put out the fire—this job can be much more difficult and take longer if the house is capped with a metal roof.

 

What’s involved in how to install metal roofing

A steel roof is a lifetime investment, lasting 50 years or more if it’s a good one. Asphalt roofs typically last 20 to 30 years, depending on the installation and shingle quality. So, the investment might be worth it, but the range of choices makes shopping for a steel roofing system more complicated than you might think.

If you want to install steel over asphalt, your best choice for installing metal roofing is to use a steel shingle system like the one shown instead of the more common (and more expensive) standing seam steel. In a standing seam roof, long, single panels run vertically all the way from the eave to the ridge. In contrast, steel shingles are small panels installed in horizontal rows much like other shingles.

Better steel shingle systems, like the one shown, install over a framework of 2x2s. This framework has three big advantages. First, because the frame is screwed directly to the rafters and the interlocked shingles are screwed to the frame, the roof can withstand winds of up to 120 mph without damage. Second, the frame creates a flat and straight surface even when the shingles are badly curled or the roof ridge is bowed.

Finally, the frame creates a ventilation gap that helps prevent ice dams in the winter and cools the roof and the house in the summer. To vent the roof, holes are cut in the old roof (Detail 1) above the soffit, which pulls air through the soffit vents underneath. Cool outside air then travels under the shingles to the vented ridge (Detail 2), pulling out moisture and heat.

 

What causes condensation on metal panels?

When temperature and humidity conditions reach dew point, moisture can condense on the underside of metal roofing and potentially cause water damage to the inside of your customer’s building. Those drips from ceilings and surface moisture occur when warm air comes in contact with the cooler roofline or walls.

High interior humidity—a common cause of condensation in metal buildings—can result from heating and air conditioning systems, how the building is used, gas-fired heating components, improper construction techniques or even human respiration, as these all give off moisture vapor.

Effects of condensation on different types of panels:

If there is an abundance of condensation, water droplets will form and can cause damage. In metal buildings, there are a few possible consequences of trapped moisture in wall and roof systems:

  • Corrosion of metal components, even on surface-treated metal: When exposed to moisture, metal components can oxidize and weaken, decreasing the life of your customer’s building.
  • Degradation/ reduced effectiveness of the thermal performance of insulation
  • Mold or mildew growth, which can cause unpleasant odors and increase health risks, particularly for those with allergies or asthma
  • Insect infestations

Note: The probability of significant problems will depend on the location and usage of your customer’s building.

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Make A Good Exterior Painting For A Beautifull House

Give your house a fresh, updated look with exterior paint.

Materials Needed:

  • exterior flat or eggshell paint
  • exterior semigloss paint
  • pressure washer
  • paint sprayer
  • paintbrush
  • painter’s tape
  • drop cloths
  • ladder
  • paint scraper
  • stain-blocking primer
  • epoxy filler
  • medium-grit sanding block
  • spackle knife
  • exterior caulk
  • caulk gun
  • plastic sheeting

Step 1: Pressure-Wash Walls

To ensure best coverage, remove dirt and dust buildup from house using a pressure washer. TIP: Work your way from top to bottom of house in a smooth, controlled manner, overlapping each stroke by 8 inches.

Step 2: Repair Damaged Surfaces

Walk around entire perimeter of house taking note of damaged surfaces such as: wood, masonry, metal, siding or stucco. Apply epoxy filler to cracks or holes using spackle knife. Once dry, lightly sand using medium-grit sanding block.

Step 3: Remove Loose Paint

Once exterior is dry, walk around perimeter of house taking note of any loose or chipped paint. Place drop cloths along ground, then remove chipped and loose paint using paint scraper or medium-grit sanding block.

Step 4: Caulk Trim

Fill any gaps between house and trim around doors and windows using exterior caulk and caulk gun. If house has mixed materials such as siding and brick, add caulk along surface where different materials meet.

Step 5: Prime Stains

Examine exterior for any stains or visible wood knots. Apply one coat of stain-blocking primer to area using paintbrush.

Step 6: Protect Doors, Windows and Lights

Cover doors, windows and lighting fixtures using plastic sheeting and painter’s tape.

Step 7: Paint Exterior

Load flat or eggshell exterior paint color into paint sprayer. Depending on intensity of hue, apply one or two coats of flat or eggshell exterior paint to entire house. Be sure to work your way from top to bottom in a smooth, controlled manner, overlapping each stroke by 8 inches. TIP: When changing exterior color from light to dark or dark to light, start with a coat of primer to ensure proper coverage. Primer is not necessary when a fresh coat of existing color is being applied.

Step 8: Paint Trim and Doors

Remove plastic sheeting from doors, windows and lighting fixtures. Add two coats of exterior semigloss paint color to woodwork and doors using paintbrush. Remove drop cloths.

 

10 Things You Must Know When Painting a House Exterior

From choosing the right paint to prepping your home’s exterior, we’ve got the best tips to make exterior painting a breeze.

  1. Consider Mother Nature

Plan ahead when painting. The time of year is key, so understand your local weather patterns. Select a dry time of year when there is little rain and lower humidity. Paint needs time to dry and will not adhere to surfaces that are not dry.

  1. Quality Over Price

Better quality paint means you will paint fewer times over the years, and you’ll get better coverage when you do paint. Paint technology has improved dramatically in the past few years, with colors guaranteed to last longer than ever before. You may be tempted to skimp on paint to save money up front with a cheaper brand, but you’re bound to have trouble and eventually pay more in the long run.

  1. Sand and Wash

Paint won’t adhere very well to dirty or rough surfaces, so be sure to clean the siding and trim thoroughly, allow to dry, and sand. Be sure to sand (or scrape as needed) any peeling paint to create a solid surface for the paint to adhere.

  1. Paint Doesn’t Stick to Rotten Siding

Rotten wood and siding material are nearly worthless to paint, as they will do nothing but to continue to deteriorate. You have a couple of options. Replace the siding or wood trim with new components, or in the case of small areas, use a wood hardener and match with an exterior filler product, such as a wood filler. Be sure to prep and sand either one prior to painting.

  1. Use Primer

The rule of thumb has always been to apply a good coat of primer, sand, then apply your color coats. This is still a good rule to follow, but new paint technologies have combined primer and paint into one product, which manufacturers assert will cut down on the number of coats you will have to apply. This newer paint is more expensive, but may be comparable to the purchase of separate primer and paint. Look at reviews of these newer paints, particular from folks that have used it in your area.

  1. Combine Cans of Paint

Mixing multiple cans of the same color of paint into a larger container, such as a five-gallon bucket, will help ensure a uniform color is applied to your home’s exterior. This step, called boxing the paint, is a method the pros follow. This step is important if, for example, you initially bought a gallon or two of paint less than you needed and then picked up the extra gallons at a later time.

  1. Paint From Top to Bottom

Starting at the top and working your way down while painting helps control streaks, as you will be working with gravity rather than against it. Drips are inevitable, but this method will allow you to feather out mishaps in the direction you are working.

  1. Seal It Off

Properly close your paint containers with their lids after you finish for the day to keep the paint from drying out. Use a rubber mallet to lightly hammer the lid shut. You can also add a plastic wrap film over the opening to ensure a tight seal.

  1. Add Grit

Painted porches (particularly steps) and other painted floors can become a bit too slick with a coat of paint alone, so add a little bit of fine sand to the paint to add traction. You can use play sand or additives that manufacturers have begun producing to provide this extra texture.

  1. Prep The Landscape

It’s easy to forget how messy painting can be, so be sure to cover the ground, bushes and any other vegetation below the area you are painting. Also move or cover up any outdoor furniture, hoses, grills, etc. Use drop cloths and weigh them down on the corners or securely wrap them around the items you are protecting.

 

10 Inspiring Exterior House Paint Color Ideas

From clean whites and pleasing neutrals to cool blues and vibrant reds, exterior paint colors are your home’s calling card to the world. Calibrate the color right and you’ll have a house exterior that welcomes visitors when they roll up to your home. More importantly, the right exterior color will give you joy every time you return home, for years to come.

01.Waterfront Blues

A Twin Cities builder of high-end properties, Hendel Homes chose a spot-on perfect blue for the exterior of this waterfront cottage. The combination of blue and white offers a lively yet traditional look.

02.Desert Oasis

Like an artist coordinating all elements of a painting, a house color consultant draws in many aspects of a home before choosing the final colors. Designer and color consultant Kimberly Laten, from Color Design LLC, expertly gauged the tan intensity of this Arizona home’s stucco exterior based on many factors, including the dazzling blue desert sky and white clouds, lush green lawn, and earthy olive-green succulents.

03.Farmhouse Charm

If your dream is a white farmhouse-style home, follow the lead of Wendy Durnwald of the lifestyle blog, Life on the Shady Grove. For her “pretend farmhouse,” as she puts it, Wendy sought out an elegant white that would steer clear of sterile and dull. After all, for an active property filled with five children and many sheep, things are not boring at all. She chose a soft, warm, and rich white exterior paint color: Sherwin-Williams Roman Column.

04.Beautified Brick

When home blogger Traci and husband Cy were tasked with the job of reviving a home exterior in Nashville, they knew the first order of business was to brighten up the brick. They began with the Sherwin-Williams color Balanced Beige (SW7037) and had a local Lowe’s store shade it down to a darker, friendlier beige color. The turquoise door (Sherwin-Williams Reflecting Pool) in semi-gloss plays well with the beige paint and the dark natural wood shutters.

05.Craftsman Green

When you have a gorgeous, sprawling Craftsman style home set in the woods, you’ll want an exterior paint color that works with, not against, your surroundings. The green color of this sustainable home, from Asheville architects ACM Design PA, works in perfect harmony with the lush surrounding trees as well as with the manufactured stone veneer apron and crisp white trim.

06.Timeless Contrast

Without a doubt, it’s a look that rarely goes wrong. When you have a traditionally styled home with plenty of trim and other details, you best serve that home aesthetically when you increase the contrast between the trim and the field color. For the broad white trim of this new-construction home, Illinois-based JB Architecture wisely shaded down the field color’s gray to emphasize its difference from the white trim.

07.Tudor Bold

Tudor-style home exterior paint jobs are characterized by one thing: dark trim against a lighter field wall color. Heidi Nyline of Warline Painting, in Vancouver, British Columbia, notes that these browns and blacks are a shout-out to the Tudor’s historical past when the trim was made of natural wood that had been oiled and darkened over time. What really wins the game, though, is the zesty red front door that beckons owners and visitors alike to visit this gorgeous property.

08.Cottage Blue

Can you balance blues, whites, and reds on a home exterior without going the full-on patriotic red, white, and blue route? Taylor Cabot, a Portland, Oregon architect, did just that with his 1923 cottage. Saying that he most decidedly “did not want the house to look like an American flag,” he went with a deeper, shadier blue for the main body of the house. The red, too, was not a bright patriotic red but, like the blue, was shaded down into a darker maroon.

09.Embrace Brown

As a professional color consultant who has appeared on HGTV, Ken Roginski knows all about colors. And his advice to homeowners who avoid brown is to not be afraid of darker colors. Brightening the trim dials up the contrast with the brown paint, producing a classic effect that’s very easy on the eyes much like this Florida home.

10.Red Punch

Vibrant red exterior paint graces this townhouse from Motion Space Architecture + Design bordering a wetland. This home’s color ramps up the vitality with a stately brick-red that stands boldly against a backdrop of drizzly Seattle skies

 

Top Exterior House Color Schemes

  1. Gray

Trending both inside and out is gray in all shades. Depending on what you choose for your siding, it can be complemented by different accent colors. A light gray home looks great with black and white accents, making it a look that will never go out of style. While dark gray really pops with white accents on your trim and shutters, with a yellow or blue front door. This is a hot color scheme that will be in style for a long time.

  1. Beige

If you’re looking to stay neutral, beige is a great exterior home color. This can be paired with white accents along with the trim, shutters and front door for a clean look. It’s a look that will never go out of style and is great if you’re looking to sell your home.

However, if you’d like to add a little color to your home’s exterior, red makes a great accent color for the front door, railings and more.

  1. Brown

Dark brown is often associated with a rustic home look. It’s warm and inviting, with the right colors. Against a dark brown, a tan or light brown works well as an accent neutral. For an accent hue, dark green or deep red make great choices here as well. However, stained wood front doors, railings and other exterior elements will really help complete this rustic look.

  1. White

Some homeowners tend to shy away from white as an exterior home color because it can get dirty. However, it actually gives off a clean and elegant style for your home. Accent colors can be fun to play with here because white makes for the perfect canvas for anything to stand out. Black and white are always a combination that will go together but, have you considered a black, white and gray home?

On a white home, the color of your front door will really stand out from the rest. So, if you like to play with color, this could be the perfect color for your exterior siding.

  1. Green

Light, sage green is the new up-and-coming color for home exteriors. If you’re looking for a non-neutral but not ready to take a bold step into one of the brighter hues, this is the color for you. Paired with gray and white, it’s a great color scheme to introduce to your home.

  1. Navy Blue

Another bold color look that’s becoming more popular is navy blue. Paired with a white accent and for a bit of a bolder look, a red front door, it is sure to make your home stand out in a wonderful way on your block.

  1. Red

For homeowners who want a bold look, red is the way to go. Of course, it should be complimented by plenty of accent neutrals to even out the look. White and dark gray perfectly compliment a red home to make it warm and welcoming.

 

Priming Your Home’s Exterior Before Painting

On most unpainted exterior surfaces, the standard procedure calls for a primer coat followed by two topcoats of paint. This procedure is also recommended for any painted surface that requires significant scraping and repairs. However, you may be topcoating only because the surface is dull or because you want a new color. If that’s the case and the existing paint is sound, a single coat of “one-coat” acrylic latex paint applied properly offers adequate protection and coverage in lieu of the two topcoats.

You can apply quality latex paint over any oil- or latex-painted surface that’s in good shape. If the paint is sound, you generally need to prime only scraped or repaired areas. You can also use a stain-blocking primer in lieu of regular primer to seal knots in board siding or trim and to cover stains that you can’t remove, such as rust.

If you’re applying latex paint over a glossy paint, play it safe and prime the entire house, even if you’ve sanded or treated the existing finish with a deglosser. Hardboard siding may also require a primer. As a general rule, use an alkyd primer and a latex topcoat when repainting.

Be sure that your primer is appropriate for the surface you’re painting. Cedar and redwood, for example, usually require an oil-based primer to seal the surface so that tannin stains don’t bleed through the topcoat. Also make sure that the primer and topcoat are compatible. How do you know? By telling your supplier what you’re painting, reading the label, and (though not always necessary) using the same brand of primer and topcoat. To make it easier for a colored topcoat to cover primer, have your paint dealer tint the primer to the approximate color of the finish coat.

If you already have three or more coats of oil-based paint on the house, use oil-based house paint.

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Mold Remediation Can Eliminate The Dangers Of Mold

DANGERS OF MOLD AND HOW MOLD REMEDIATION CAN ELIMINATE THOSE DANGERS

There are many who are not aware of what mold is. Mold is a type of fungus. It is normally displayed in an array of colors such as blue and greens. Normally mold grows in areas where there is a high abundance of moisture that cannot be controlled.

Mold can grow on almost anything including wood, food, plants, walls, and ceilings. Mold reproduces by releasing a large population of spores. The spores can withstand extreme temperatures and are very enduring.

Dealing with mold can be tough because when breathed in or direct contact with it can cause health complications. This is why there are masks and remediation kits designed to deal with mold problems and reduce the threat of health complications.

Studies have shown that even people who are healthy can become affected by mold. One of the most common problems with mold exposure is allergic reactions. Other problems have been linked to the following:

  • Respiratory
  • Asthma
  • Respiratory system failure

Remediation is the clean up and the elimination of mold. Mold is toxic and should be removed whenever it is observed no matter if it is in the home, outside of the home, or in a business. There are professional mold removal specialists that can help.

Mold is developed in areas where there is moisture present. The most common areas for mold are the bathroom, basement, and kitchen as these are areas that deal with water. Mold has been known to grow within 24-48 hours of the moisture buildup.

There are many different types of mold found in homes. In fact, there are more than 100 different kinds of mold. Some of the most common types of mold found in homes are:

  • Alternaria
  • Botrytis
  • Penicillium
  • Stachybotrys Chartarum

If there is confusion about the type of mold growing in the home, there are mold inspections that can be done by professionals. Inspectors know what to look for and where. There are plenty of reasons to be concerned about the type of mold that’s growing in the home. These and many others are benefits of a mold inspection:

  • Eliminates smell of mold in home
  • Rids walls and ceiling of bacteria
  • Peace of mind
  • Detects leakage problems

A mold inspection comes in two stages; the first one is the collection of samples. The second one is to determine the species of mold. This will give the experts an idea about the toxicity level of the mold and how to effectively remove it.

Remediation is done on a professional level. Mold needs to be removed through special equipment. Most people think that using chemicals on it will eliminate it, but bleach and other cleaners will not kill off the mold or prevent it from growing.

Mold removal can be done in the areas where it is seen and also in nearby areas. Mold grows very fast therefore spreading quickly. Once mold spores have gotten into the air, they are normally spreads throughout from the HVAC system.

When mold has developed inside of the ductwork to a HVAC system, there is professional ductwork cleaning services available to take on all sorts of mold colonies. Professionals are highly recommended at this level of remediation.

Mold remediation experts usually take advantage of state of the art equipment using high velocity air scrubbers. This helps to remove the mold out of the air. Also, special heap vacuums are used to catch small and large spores.

Black mold is the deadliest form of mold there is. It is unhealthy for all age groups to be exposed to. In some cases, there are groups of people that are more sensitive to black mold as these groups of people have weaker immune systems:

  • Seniors
  • Children
  • Pregnant women

Mold should never be handled by someone that does not have experience around it. Direct contact with it can result in dry, red, irritated skin. It may feel like a burning sensation and medical attention may be needed.

Over half of the homes in the United States have mold problems. Inspections along with remediation specialists should be taken advantage of in these situations. Mold remediation can prevent health problems and creates a healthier living environment for all to enjoy.

 

4 Signs That You Need Mold Remediation

Mold may be present in your home and affecting your life even if no actual mold is visible. Here are four things that may indicate you need mold remediation.

The general rule is that when mold is visible, it is time to kill it and remove it. But mold isn’t always visible and so there are other criteria to strongly consider when it comes to mold remediation. Here are the four criteria to look for mold in your home.

  1. A water event or occasional/frequent water intrusion

Has there been recent water intrusion? Water does not necessarily equal mold growth as spores have to already be present. But since mold spores are microscopic (2-10 microns), a water event is usually the trigger that causes mold to be seen or otherwise detected.

Note: Mold means moisture or humidity is, or has been present. Water does not necessarily mean mold growth is present.

  1. Discoloration

Most molds cause the organic material the mold is consuming to change colors. Whether the food source for the mold is human food or drywall paper, if colonization is allowed for enough time, there will usually be a discoloration that will reveal a mold problem.

Most molds, when allowed to grow in abundance, are visibly seen in certain colors. Mold is not only black. Many species are visible in gray, white, brown, red and even some hues of pastel colors. Some molds look like dust, or fuzz, while others look like sand granules. Certain molds thrive on certain food sources, and they all require different moisture content or relative humidity in the ambient air.

Note: Water seeping through masonry sometimes causes a white crystalline, powder-like discoloration called “efflorescence”. This substance is made up of minerals and should not be confused with mold.

  1. A musty odor

Is there a musty odor that prevails, or come and goes? Some molds are odorous when colonizing. Although some species do not cause odors, when a musty, moldy odor is combined with other criteria, one can conclude that mold is present. Even if mold is not visible, remediation may be necessary.

Note: Some individuals have a great sense of smell. Others may think that they do. Odor alone should not be the only criterion used to determine whether remediation is necessary. Some actively colonizing fungal species give off odors. Dead or dormant spores generally do not, but are just as detrimental to human health. Absence of odor does not mean that there is no mold and odor does not mean that it is caused from fungal growth. Do not rely solely on scent for detection.

  1. Adverse human health effects

A good indication that there is “unacceptable fungal ecology” within a building envelope is that occupants feel health symptoms when spending extended periods of time in a certain space and feel much better when spending extended periods of time outside that space. If residents in a home or employees in a workplace experience congestion, allergy symptoms, headaches, fatigue or respiratory problems after each night’s sleep or after the end of each work day, this may be an indication of unhealthy air quality.

One environmental hazard to cause unhealthy air quality is a mold infestation. If one spends a week on vacation away from work and home and all symptoms disappear, perhaps the home, school or workplace has unacceptable fungal ecology or unhealthy indoor air quality

 

What is performed with a Mold Remediation Protocol?

Interview – Review and discussion with an authorized representative of the Property of current conditions which has led to the claim.

Site Assessment – A physical site assessment of the Property in the area(s) of concern to: visually assess the damage(s), retrieve temperature and RH readings, take air and direct samples for mold (if applicable), and gather room dimension to create room/floor drawings to identify the location(s) of concern.

  • Air Sampling – The purpose of non-viable spore trap air sampling is to provide an approximation of the airborne microbial (fungal) spore concentrations. A minimum of one control sample is typically taken outside the most common used entrance into the building, then one or more air samples are collected in the areas of concern within the building. Elevated airborne spore concentrations may indicate an indoor microbial reservoir(s), or that cleaning of personal effects or the HVAC system(s), is a necessary component of a microbial remediation plan.
  • Direct sampling – The purpose of direct sampling is to identify the type and concentration of microbial spores present on affected materials identified with suspect visible microbial growth. The sampling results are also used for reference for source contamination when air samples are taken.

Non-Scope Items – include visual identification and records review for:

  • Asbestos Containing Building Materials (ACM)
  • Lead-Based Paint
  • Fire Reduction Chemicals

Qualifications: No federal guidelines exist at this time. However, some States have placed requirements for licensed Mold Assessors and Mold Remediators. For those States that do not have specific requirements, it is recommended that you use a person who:

  • Has taken a minimum of 24 hours of mold assessment and remediation courses,
  • Follows one of more of the recognized industry guidance and practices, and
  • Acquires, at a minimum, 8 Continuing Educational Units (CEUs) bi-annually.

 

What Happens During Mold Remediation

No one likes surprises when having any kind of work done in one’s home. It is a disruptive situation no matter what the project. In the case of mold remediation, you are going to have strangers in your home in “other worldly” outfits using serious chemicals. You will feel much less stressed if you know just what the mold remediation company’s MO is.

Firstly, you have a few things to do before the remediation crew arrives:

Fix the water problem that caused the mold. Mold remediation is an involved and costly process. You don’t want to have to do it all over again.

Clear a path for the crew to move easily from the outside to the mold area and back. For instance, remove cars from the driveway and garage.

Keep pets out of the way—in a room with the door closed, in the yard if the crew won’t be working there.

The mold remediation company parks the truck as close to the house as possible, lays plastic sheeting down and runs hoses from the doorway to the mold area (unless they can access the mold area from outside of the home, such as in the case of a crawlspace).

The mold remediation workers suit up: head-to-toe white suits, booties, respirators and goggles. They do this on every job, toxic mold or non-toxic. They then spray the mold area with an EPA-approved biocide (mold killer). The workers leave while the biocide does its thing.

The next day, the mold remediation crew returns, puts down plastic and suits up. They then spray the mold area with an encapsulant, a type of paint or whitewash that encloses (as if in a capsule) any mold spores that remain. They should spray well beyond the treated area to eliminate any chance of mold growth. For example, the whole attic should be sprayed even if the mold is confined to one spot. Tip: Confirm that the company’s procedure includes this before you sign the contract.

Next, the crews cleans the air with an HEPA (High Efficiency Particular Air) air scrubber and an air exchange that replaces moldy air with clean, fresh air. The final step is using an HEPA vacuum to clean the floor or any surface that can be vacuumed to remove stubborn spores that linger.

Mold remediation usually includes disposal of moldy porous building materials (drywall, insulation, etc.) and cleaning and disinfecting carpet and personal items if they can be saved.

Have a post-remediation inspection done to ensure that the remediation was performed properly. The company that did your initial mold inspection and testing can take care of that.

 

How to Keep Mold from Coming Back

Fortunately for homeowners who’ve recently undergone mold remediation, there are preventive measures that you can take to help keep mold from growing back. Here are some proactive steps that you can take to keep mold away for good:

  1. Identify areas where there’s a moisture problem, and correct it. Basements and other areas prone to moist air can benefit immensely from the presence of a dehumidifier. For low-lying areas, sump pumps provide an additional line of protection by removing excess water automatically. Take note of any moisture you notice in your home. This can include dark spots on ceilings that indicate a leaky roof, or musty smells inside a closet. Fixing water leaks and replacing decaying wood can go a long way toward keeping your home free of unwanted fungi.
  2. Dry wet areas as soon as possible. If water gets into your home, remove it as soon as possible. For example, if you have water in your basement from a burst plumbing pipe or a heavy rainstorm, dry out the area immediately, before there’s time for mold to take root. Even seemingly mundane things, like leaving wet clothes in the washer for a few days, can be an invitation for mold.
  3. Keep out moisture with proper ventilation. Appliances that produce moisture, like clothes dryers and stoves, should vent outside. You should check your AC unit periodically to make sure it’s not generating moisture. If it’s leaking, dripping, or the coils are covered in condensate, you probably need to call an HVAC repair service.
  4. Use mold-resistant building materials whenever possible. This may not be possible in already existing homes, but if you’re remodeling, building an addition, or building a custom home, it’s a good way to stay one step ahead of mold. There are newer varieties of drywall and Sheetrock that are paperless– instead of gypsum covered with paper, they use fiberglass instead. This creates a highly water-resistant surface, and mold cannot break down and metabolize it. This is especially useful in bathrooms, kitchens, laundry rooms, and other areas where moisture is pretty much a given.
  5. Keep your indoor humidity between 30 and 60 percent. If your home is humid, and you notice a lot of water condensing near windows and pipes, consider using dehumidifiers.

 

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Kill Bed Bugs With Pest Control

How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs

Have you discovered bed bugs in your home or have bites from bed bugs? A treatment by a professional pest control company or exterminator may not be in your budget or work with your schedule.

Luckily, it is possible to treat a bed bug infestation yourself without spending a fortune. You must be diligent and committed to the treatment process, but you can eliminate bed bugs yourself! Read our guide below for the 4-step DIY bed bug treatment process.

STEP 1: Preparing a Room for Bed Bug Treatment

Before you begin your own bed bug treatment, you will need to prepare the room or rooms where bed bugs have been found, in addition to rooms that share walls with the infested rooms. Remove any items in the room that you absolutely cannot treat or that have already been treated. Cover items that will be removed from the room in plastic bags before moving to the next room to prevent any unseen bed bug from infesting another room.

Remove any paintings or art from the walls. Be sure to thoroughly check any item that is removed from the room to prevent bed bugs from being transferred from room to room.

If you have a mattress that is heavily infested, we recommend covering it with a bed bug proof mattress cover or bed bug mattress encasement before moving. You will also need to cover your box spring with a box spring encasement.

If your mattress needs to be disposed of and replaced, be sure to cover the mattress with plastic before disposing to protect sanitation workers. Labeling a mattress or covering with “Bed Bugs” is also helpful.

Infested sheets, linens, and garments should be washed and then dried in a household dryer on high heat (over 120 degrees F), as the heat will kill bed bugs. Any garments that cannot be washed may need to be dry-cleaned or discarded as insecticides cannot be used on these materials.

If stuffed animals, books, or soft toys are infested, place those items in an air-tight bin along with vapor strips to kill the bed bugs.

STEP 2: Treat the Cracks, Crevices, Tufts, and Folds of Your Home for Bed Bugs

Some bed bug products cannot be used where others can. Also, bed bugs can build up a resistance to certain pyrethroids, making them difficult to treat. This is why using a variety of products to kill and control bed bugs will produce the best results. We recommend using one of our bed bug kits. These kits include our most powerful and effective products for a variety of applications to save you time and money.

STEP 3: Treat Your Mattress for Bed Bugs

To get rid of bed bugs in a mattress, use an aerosol spray labeled for bed bug treatment, such as Bedlam Aerosol Spray, and spray or mist the insecticide onto the mattress. Focus on the seams, tufts, and folds of the mattress and spray until the mattress is damp. Allow mattress to dry before remaking the bed with freshly laundered sheets that have been run through a dryer on high heat.

After treating a mattress or box spring for bed bugs, we recommend encasing each in a bed bug proof cover. This will prevent re-infestation and will make future inspections and treatments easier. Be sure any product that has been sprayed or applied to your mattress is dry before you cover the mattress with a bed bug proof cover. You can make the bed with your freshly laundered linens over a bed bug proof mattress cover.

After encasing, you will not need to re-treat your mattress or box spring further. If you are not encasing your mattress or box spring, you will need to reapply the aerosol spray every 7-10 days until you do not see any further bed bug activity.

You can follow the initial aerosol spray treatment with an insecticide dust. Dusts are great for hard to reach areas like the corners of mattresses and where mattresses and box springs meet. Dusts also last for several months.

Don’t forget to dust your box spring as well. Remove the dust cover from the bottom of the box spring and dust in corners and crevices.

Again, we highly recommend encasing your mattress and box spring to avoid having to re-treat.

Characteristics of Bed Bugs

To continue cycles of mating and egg production, males and females must feed (consume a bloodmeal) once every 14 days. With regular feeding, a female can lay 1-3 eggs daily and 200-500 eggs in her lifetime. Should a bed bug’s regular feeding be interrupted, however, it can still survive for several months on one meal.

Bed bugs are not known to travel large distances on their own. However, they will attach themselves to movable objects such as bedding, boxes, clothing, and furniture. Besides residences, bed bugs are known to inhabit a variety of interior settings like offices, stores, hotels, and gyms.

Step 1: Determine the Severity of the Problem

Determine Severity

Most bed bugs are found within eight feet of a place where a human is resting. But as their population grows, so does their footprint in your home. That’s why it’s important to check the following areas:

  • Mattresses, box springs, and bedding
  • In curtains and behind peeling wallpaper
  • Under carpet
  • Cracks in furniture and in hardwood floors
  • Piles of clothing

With your flashlight and credit card, search and probe crevices to check for bed bugs. If you see these pests moving, capture them with adhesive tape. Wipe the area with soapy water to clean away any dead bed bugs, droppings, eggs, and shed skins. Also consider vacuuming the area for an even deeper cleaning.

If you have one or more rooms with substantial clutter or items strewn about, you’re providing bed bugs with a haven. The simple act of reducing clutter deprives these pests of breeding areas. But if you can see bed bugs, black or brown stains that indicate droppings, or if you experience bites, you’re likely dealing with an infestation.

Step 2: Build a Plan to Stop Further Infestation

Build A Plan

With their ability to hide, their tiny size, and their frequent reproduction, you may find it challenging to remove bed bugs from your home. Making matters worse, the egg stage of a bed bug’s life is actually quite resistant to many forms of treatment. Recognize that ridding your home of these pests make take a number of steps.

Step 3: Take Action to Eliminate the Bed Bugs

Take Action

Your DIY tactics will play an important role in evicting pests. Experts suggest the following tasks to clean rooms, wipe out bed bug homes, and discourage their spread:

  • De-clutter rooms of your house or apartment
  • Buy a mattress encasement to protect your mattress and box spring
  • Vacuum multiple times each week as you fend off the pests
  • Wash and dry your clothes at the hottest setting (at least 120 degrees) to kill any bed bugs
  • Apply caulk to cracks and crevices seen in walls and door frames
  • Contact a pest control specialist if signs of infestation continue

Step 4: Check Your Results

Check Your Results

Give your efforts a full week to take effect. This should be enough time in case any eggs were missed during cleaning. If the results are not to your liking, contact a pest control specialist. The infestation may require an insecticide, which is best handled and deployed by a professional.

Bed Bugs and Humans

Remember that bed bugs are not known to carry diseases to humans. But our exposed areas of skin – the hands, neck, face, leg, and arms – are open targets to bed bugs when we sleep.

You may not even be aware of a bed bug bite since these are not known to be painful. In fact, hours or days may pass before you notice signs like swelling, bleeding, or secondary infection at the site(s) on your skin if the bites are not cleaned. This reaction is more likely in small children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems.

Weather and Seasonal Behavior of Bed Bugs

Higher temperatures are a bed bug’s ally for a few reasons. First, heat quickens the pest’s life cycle. In everything from feeding to the maturing of eggs to general movement, hotter days are a bed bug’s comfort zone.

This means that your home is potentially a prime habitat for bed bugs throughout the year. Because winter temperatures are extremely uncomfortable to bed bugs – and sends them into a dormant state called diapause – they will always seek a warmer environment. The controlled climate of your home provides a setting where they can be active all year. If the clothes we wear carry these pests, then we help them reach new sites for infestation. This means that controlling and eliminating bed bugs can be done at any time on the calendar.

Removing bedbugs

Bedbugs measure just 5 millimeters across—smaller than a pencil eraser. These bugs are smart, tough, and they reproduce quickly. Bedbugs know where to hide to avoid detection, they can live for months between meals, and a healthy female can lay 500 eggs in her lifetime.

No surprise that these tiny bloodsuckers can wreak a lot of havoc in your home. If they get into bed with you, they can leave red, itchy welts all over your body.

Fortunately, you can get rid of bedbugs. Be patient as removing bedbugs often takes some time and effort. You may have to try a few different chemical and non-chemical approaches, especially if you have a large infestation.

Certain factors can make bedbugs harder to remove. You may have a tougher time ridding your home of them if you have a lot of clutter, or you travel often and bring new bedbugs home in your luggage.

If you can’t rid your home on your own, you may have to call in a professional exterminator. Read on for a step-by-step guide on getting rid of bedbugs.

Step 1: Identify all infested areas

If you’ve got bedbugs, you want to find them early before they start to reproduce. It’s much easier—and cheaper—to treat a small infestation than a big one. Yet smaller infestations can be harder to detect.

Search for bedbugs yourself, or hire a professional to do an inspection. Some inspectors use specially trained dogs to hunt down bedbugs by scent.

Bedbugs’ small, narrow bodies enable them to squeeze into tiny spots—like the seams of a mattress or couch, and the folds of curtains.

Also look for them in places like these:

  • near the tags of the mattress and box spring
  • in cracks in the bed frame and headboard
  • in baseboards
  • between couch cushions
  • in furniture joints
  • inside electrical outlets
  • under loose wallpaper
  • underneath paintings and posters on the walls
  • in the seam where the wallpaper and ceiling meet

Use a flashlight and magnifying glass to go over all of these areas.

You can spot bedbugs by these signs:

  • live bedbugs, which are reddish and about ¼-inch long
  • dark spots about the size of a period—these are bedbug droppings
  • reddish stains on your mattress from bugs that have been crushed
  • small, pale yellow eggs, egg shells, and yellowish skins that young bedbugs shed

Once you find a bedbug, put it in a sealed jar along with 1 teaspoon of rubbing alcohol. Other types of bugs can look a lot like bedbugs. If you’re not sure what type of bug you’ve found, bring it to an exterminator or entomologist to identify.

Step 2: Contain the infestation

Once you know you have bedbugs, you need to keep them contained so you can get rid of them. A quick and easy way to trap bedbugs is with your vacuum. Run the vacuum over any possible hiding places.

This includes your:

  • bed
  • dresser
  • carpets
  • electronics (like TVs)

Seal up the vacuumed contents into a plastic bag and throw it away. Then thoroughly clean out the vacuum.

Seal up all your linens and affected clothes in plastic bags until you can wash them. Then put them on the highest possible temperature setting in the washer and dryer. If an item can’t be washed, put it in the dryer for 30 minutes at the highest heat setting.

Anything that can’t be treated in the washer and dryer, place in a plastic bag. Leave it there for a few months, if possible, to make sure all the bugs die. If you can’t clean furniture, throw it away. Tear it up first and spray paint the words “bedbugs” on it so no one else tries to take it home.

Step 3: Prep for bedbug treatment

Before you start treating your home, do a little prep work to maximize your odds of success. Make sure all your linens, carpets, drapes, clothing, and other hiding places have been cleaned or thrown out (see Step 2).

Next, get rid of bedbug hiding places. Pick up books, magazines, clothes, and anything else that’s lying on your floor and under your bed. Throw out whatever you can. Don’t move items from an infested room to a clean one—you could spread the bugs.

Seal up any open areas. Glue down loose wallpaper. Caulk cracks in furniture and around baseboards. Tape up open electrical outlets. Finally, move your bed at least 6 inches away from the wall so bedbugs can’t climb on.

Step 4: Kill the bedbugs

Home cleaning methods

You can first try to remove bedbugs without chemicals. These bugs are pretty easy to kill with high heat, 115°F (46°C), or intense cold , 32°F(less than 0°C

Here are a few ways to treat bedbugs using these methods:

  • Wash bedding and clothes in hot water for 30 minutes. Then put them in a dryer on the highest heat setting for 30 minutes.
  • Use a steamer on mattresses, couches, and other places where bedbugs hide.
  • Pack up infested items in black bags and leave them outside on a hot day (95 degrees) or in a closed car. In cooler temperatures, it can take two to five months to kill sealed-up bugs.
  • Put bags containing bedbugs in the freezer at 0°F (-17°C). Use a thermometer to check the temperature. Leave them in there for at least four days.

Once you’ve cleaned all visible bedbugs, make the area inhospitable for their friends. Place bedbug-proof covers over your mattress and box spring. Zip these covers up all the way. Bugs that are trapped inside will die, and new bugs won’t be able to get in.

If these methods don’t wipe out all the bugs, you may need to try an insecticide.

Using “Isolation” to Thwart Bed Bugs

In addition to insecticides, PMPs have various non-chemical techniques available to them to control bed bugs. Vacuuming, trapping, heat, cold and steam are important components, especially in situations where bed bugs are showing signs of resistance to insecticides.

There’s one non-chemical tool, isolation, that you may be using or recommending without even realizing it. If you can isolate or separate people from the bed bugs in their homes, you will naturally reduce bed bug bites and reduce bed bug anxiety.

Isolating the bed from bed bugs is especially important in infested apartments or residential sites where infestations remain uncontrolled (for various reasons) and people must live with bed bugs for the time being. Bed isolation can provide a measure of relief.

COOPERATION IS KEY. Isolation involves special manipulation of the bed or other sleeping area so that bed bugs can’t reach sleeping people. Isolation methods require the cooperation of your customer. Although you may show the customer initially how to turn their bed into an isolation “island,” they will then be largely responsible for maintaining the system. It’s a simple process, but it’s a multi-step process. For that reason, it’s very important that you make sure your customer understands the concept of bed isolation.

Explain to your customer how bed bugs get to their hosts to feed. Some bed bugs are hiding right in the bed, but more are hiding in cracks and crevices nearby, coming out at night and making their way onto the bed. People make it easy for them to do so by providing “bridges” that connect from the floor or wall or furniture directly to the bed. Climbing right up the bed leg is probably the most common way for bed bugs to reach their host. They also get onto beds by moving from draperies that touch, or up bed skirts that reach the floor, or by climbing up from boxes and other items stored under the bed.

The goal is to make the bed an island that does not touch anything and nothing touches it. The bed should not make any contact with the walls or floor other than through the bed’s legs, which are sitting in the middle of their own islands, moat-style interceptor traps. Anything that touches the floor and thus creates a bridge, such as a bed skirt or bedspread, will provide a travel route for bed bugs and destroy the protection.

Proper bed isolation can offer almost immediate relief to residents at the beginning of a bed bug control program. In some accounts, you may be constrained from providing the level of bed bug control necessary to completely eliminate an infestation, but you can still offer the possibility of a good night’s sleep to bed bug-weary customers.

Bed Bug Control – How to Get Rid of Bed Bugs

Reduce Clutter:

Remove all personal items (stuffed animals, soft toys, blankets, electronics, etc) and anything that does not stay in the room permanently. Caution: Be mindful that items from the infested area can transfer bed bugs to other areas.

Launder Infested Garments and Linens:

Infested garments and bed linen cannot be treated with insecticide. They need to be laundered in hot water (120 degrees fahrenheit minimum). If washing is not available, heating the garments or bed linens for several minutes in a clothes dryer may work.

Dismantle Bed Frames:

Dismantling bed frames in infested areas typically exposes bed bug hiding sites. Having access to these areas during cleaning is important. Stand up the box spring and shine a flashlight through the gauze fabric and look for bed bugs. If the fabric is torn (possible hiding place), remove fabric to prepare for spraying. Once covered with these encasements, bed bugs can not enter or exit. There is no need to treat the mattress or box spring when using these encasements. Keep them on for a year.

Remove Dresser Drawers:

Remove drawers from desks and dressers since bed bugs like to hide in these areas. Turn furniture over to inspect and clean all hiding spots. All furniture should be pulled away from the walls.

Clean the Area

Scrub infested surfaces with a stiff brush to dislodge eggs. Vacuum the room extensively. Use a vacuum hose attachment to thoroughly vacuum cracks and crevices on furniture and along baseboards on the walls. Vacuum along baseboards, furniture, bed stands, rails, headboards, foot boards, bed seams, tufts, buttons, edges of the bedding, as well as the edges of the carpets (particularly along the tack strips). A good vacuum cleaning job may remove particles from cracks and crevices to encourage greater insecticide penetration. Bed bugs cling tightly to surfaces, so it is best to vacuum by scraping the end of the vacuum attachment over the infested areas to pull out the bed bugs. Caution: It is not good to use a bristle attachment, because you may transfer bed bugs to other areas since they cling to the brush. Dispose of vacuum cleaner bags after you are finished in an outdoor trashcan.

Caulk and Seal

Caulk and seal all holes where pipes and wires penetrate walls and floor, and fill cracks around baseboards and molding to further reduce harboring areas.

Bed Bug Appearance

Tip: The common Bed Bug can be seen with the naked eye. Since bed bugs are difficult to see, use a magnifying glass.

Adult bed bugs are brown to reddish-brown, oval-shaped, flattened, and about 1/4 to 5/8 inch long. Note: Their flat shape enables them to readily hide in most cracks and crevices.

Tip: Eggs are not placed on the host’s body (the person sleeping in the bed), but the eggs are found on surfaces near where the host sleeps.

Bed Bug Inspection Tips:

Look in any place that offers darkness, isolation and protection to the bed bug.

Inspect adjoining rooms where an infestation is found. Even when the bed bugs themselves cannot be found, their hiding places can be located by looking for the spots of fecal material they often leave.

Bed Bug Inspection Check List

Inspect these Areas:

  • The Mattress and Box Spring
  • Bed Frame and Head / Foot Boards
  • Other Furniture
  • Walls and Carpet
  • Electronics and Appliances

The Mattress and Box Spring

Check the mattress throughly, paying close attention to seams and tufts along the edges. Flip the mattress over and inspect the bottom carefully as well. Pay particular attention to any rips in the fabric. View the fabric on the bottom of the box spring and shine a flash light to verify that bed bugs have not penetrated the interior of the box spring.

Bed Frame and Head and Foot Boards

Remove the mattress and box frame from the bed frame and shine a flash light all along every potential hiding place on the bed frame. Remember bed bugs can slip into an crack a business card can fit into.

Other Furniture: Desks, Chairs, Dressers, etc

Take out all drawers and cushions from surrounding furniture. Check all seams and crevices carefully with a flashlight. Take your time and inspect thoroughly. Bed Bugs are commonly found in these areas in an infested room.

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Mold Testing and Inspection Are Important in the Remediation Process

There are many people who might notice the warning signs of mold in the home early on without needing to do an actual test. Some people show mold symptoms while others are able to easily smell it. If that’s the case, testing for mold can be beneficial but you may already be aware that you do have a mold problem in your home.

Mold inspecting is a method of surveying an area where molds commonly hide. With the use of infrared cameras and moisture meters, inspectors are able to easily locate the molds. Although these procedures can also be done yourself, it is till best if you hire professional contractors to deal with the problem to make sure that the results are accurate, not to mention the fact that some of the molds can be hazardous to your health, so caution should always be used when dealing with them.

A simple air test can be done after remediation to determine whether or not your spore count has returned, and continued to remain at, an acceptable level. This requires that you test the air throughout your home, as well as outside your home. Testing outside your home is necessary because the outside spore count will determine what is considered “normal” and this will be compared to the samples from throughout your home.

Mold growth indoors presents a danger to your building, your belongings, and your health. Breathing in spores has been shown to increase the risk of respiratory issues, allergies, headaches, and other more serious health conditions. Mold growth on walls and other surfaces deteriorates those materials, making them less durable. It also just looks ugly and makes the affected room unpleasant to be in.

Its best to bring in a mold testing and removal company as soon as you notice the signs of mold growth. Those signs include not only visible mold and the musty odor, but also water damage such as peeling wallpaper, warped wood, and water stains. Because it thrives in a damp, dark environment, any overly humid or recently flooded area is susceptible to mold growth, whether you see obvious signs of it or not.

Dealing with mold is never fun. If the problem is widespread, resolving it can be costly. However, you can’t afford to let mold thrive on your property. The structural soundness of your building and the health and safety of its occupants are on the line.

An Accredited mold inspection, The Mold Girl offers Mold Testing in Charleston, SC for a variety of home house mold problems.

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