How To Be A Pro Wedding Dj

Can you have a DJ in your backyard?

When you’re throwing an at-home wedding, one detail that’s often overlooked until pretty late in the wedding-planning process is obtaining the necessary permits. Because every county and municipality has different requirements, you’ll want to get onto this task as soon as possible so you can get a clear understanding of what your wedding’s requirements will be. This could have implications for your end time, whether you can have a band play at your wedding, and so forth. Here’s what you need to know about permits and regulations.

Check with your county.

The big three restrictions to look out for are parking, noise, and fire. Kelsey Sheofsky, event planner and owner of outdoor events and tenting company Shelter-Co., says, “There’s usually information on your county website about noise ordinances and other regulations. Generally speaking, a party at your own home shouldn’t be a problem if you follow the rules of your community regarding parking, noise, and fire.”

Find out if the regulations are different if you’re using a tent.

Depending on where you live, there may be different rules for events involving tents as they’re considered a temporary structure. Sheofsky says, “The fire department will require you to pull permits for any party tents and open flame, but the vendors you hire will be able to assist in identifying these needs and pulling the permits.” Depending on your county’s rules, your local fire department may send out a fire marshal to visit the tent once it’s setup for your wedding. They’re looking to see that all exits are carefully marked, there’s a fire extinguisher on the premises, candles are all appropriately enclosed, and more. The company that’s installing the tent typically manages this process, and you may not even be aware that it’s happening.

Talk to the health department.

It’s fairly uncommon that you’ll need to pull permits from the health department, but there are some counties that require this if an event is bringing in portable restrooms. This is something the company you’re renting the restrooms from will likely advise on, so no need to worry too much about this.

 

Backyard Wedding Dreams: Pros and Cons Worth Considering

Sentimental? Yes. Simple? Not always. Here’s what you may not know about planning a backyard wedding celebration. There really is no place like home. Whether it’s your childhood backyard, your partner’s parents’ lakehouse or your grandparents’ country cottage, planning an at-home, backyward wedding is an amazing idea—but remember, it’s not an actual wedding venue (yet). Basically, the average home isn’t quite prepared for 150 wedding guests, 75 cars and 20 tables needed for a full-on backyard wedding.

Home Weddings Can Save Cash

Budgetary restrictions often drive the choice to host a home wedding. While traditional venues may seem expensive at first glance, it’s worth doing your research into what it might cost to bring in everything you’ll need for a wedding in your actual backyard. Since you’re so accustomed to your home, hiring a wedding coordinator will give you a fresh perspective on the property and what you can and can’t do. You’ll also need pros to cover all the basics: setting up, cooking, serving, parking cars and cleaning up (hiring a cleaning crew may be the best decision you’ll make). In the days leading up to your backyard wedding, the last thing you (or your parents) want to have to do is a massive house-scrubbing.

Your Backyard Wedding Will Demand Serious Space

You need room to say “I do.” Does your setup have enough space for all your guests? If not, you’ll have to start trimming the list. Don’t mistake overcrowded for cozy. If you plan to use a combination of indoor and outdoor space, know that if the weather takes a turn for the worst, everyone might need to fit indoors if you don’t have a tent. Will there be enough space in, say, the living room to set up white folding chairs with a wide enough aisle? The general rule is 6 to 10 square-feet of floor space per guest for row-seating.

Guests May Try to Crash

Slumber parties are fun, but adding house guests to your home wedding will only further complicate an already detail-driven day. Try to dissuade them from this idea. Unless you’re marrying at a 25-room estate, the only people who should be staying at the wedding site are the homeowners and their immediate family (the couple and any siblings, for example). You don’t want to be fighting your cousin for shower time the morning of your wedding. What you should do is recommend a hotel that’s as close to the wedding property as possible.

Outdoor Maintenance May Take Months of Advance Preparation

With your entire backyard will be on display, you’ll probably need to give the space a more manicured look. Whether that means dragging out the lawn mower or hiring a landscaper, you’ll want your lawn to be in peak form. If you’re planning a spring backyard wedding, start preparing in the fall (yes, really). Talk to your professional landscaper about reseeding, replanting and sodding.

 

Outdoor weddings

Outdoor weddings are the best! I might be biased because I run a wedding venue in my backyard, but hey. We all know weddings are, or can be, expensive. And, while many families go the wedding venue route, you might not want too.

I have experience in both circles. My two daughters were married in our backyard before there was even a thought of a wedding venue business on our property. Both were very DIY and lovely. While there are many things to consider, let’s cover the basics. The guest list will be a big factor, you will need to know approximately how many will attend so you can plan wisely.

Guest Parking:

This could require a big area if many are in attendance. People will need to park safely! There will be car doors opening and guests will need room to back out. It’s a nice idea to let the neighbors know what is going on. Also, keep a parking area open close to the reception for your vendors (cake, food, DJ, photographer, officiate, etc.) to drop things off at.

Dressing Areas:

Be sure to designate rooms for the bride and bridesmaids, grooms and groomsman, parents and grandparents to change clothes in. A lot of the wedding party will dress before coming to your property. Just be sure everyone knows the plan. We don’t want confusion on wedding day… did I really say that, lol!

Rentals:

Will you rent tables and chairs? What about linens, will you rent or use plastic ones you can throw away? Will you be expected to pick up the rentals yourself or will you have them delivered? Are you responsible for returning things? Where will things be stored, before and after the event?

Restrooms:

Will guests be allowed in your house to use the restroom or will you rent portable restrooms for the event? And, if you do rent, where will they be at? You don’t want them to far away, but you don’t want them in the photos either.

Guest Seating:

Remember, give each guest table room for chairs to move in and out, without disturbing their neighbor. If there is to be a dance floor in the middle of the tables or even off to the side, be sure to get the dimensions so you can mark off the area before setting up the tables.

 

Backyard Wedding and Reception Tips

If you’re thinking about hosting your wedding and/or reception in your backyard, we have some great tips Elegant Backyard Wedding Ideas for you.

Plan it.  Backyard weddings are a great way to save money on the venue space, although you must remember that you’ll need to consider many things before you can commit to this idea.  First question:  Do you or your parents have a backyard big enough for your wedding?  To answer this, you must think about your guest list and about what type of reception you would like to have. Do you envision a plated dinner or a buffet?  Passed hors d’oeuvres and cocktail bar or grilled picnic food?  Each type of reception comes with different capacities.  Will you also be hosting your ceremony in the backyard, or just the reception?  You’ll need even more space if you’re hosting both.

Tip:  Talk to a rental company or a catering company—yes, we can help answer these questions!—before you make this decision.  They will know how much space you will need to set up tables, booths and a dance floor to accommodate your guest count, and will likely suggest different catering options that best meets your visions and space constraints.

Prep it.  If you have at least 8 weeks’ time, you should be ready to prep the backyard.  If you’re hosting a backyard wedding in the summer, great!  Nature can take care of most of your décor costs—although you’re going to have to help it along.  Plant your gardens this year with your event design and layout in mind.  It will be difficult, though, to get your gardening in order without knowing where everything will go.

Here’s a great tip:  talk to your wedding planner, rental company or caterer about the event layout before you do any work.  Sometimes there are tables and prep areas that our clients forget to take into consideration or new layout ideas we come up with to maximize the space when we visit the site.

Theme it.  Whether you’re looking for a simple backyard wedding or an elaborate, elegant wedding design, your theme will drive most of the aesthetic decisions from here on out.  Sophisticated country?  Vintage?  Rustic?  Whimsical?  Every theme comes with different flowers, photo frames, centerpieces, chairs, linens, catering choices and more.

Tent it.  This is one of our biggest recommendations.

 

Dance floor it.

What’s a backyard wedding reception without a dance floor?  Lots of holes in the grass, that’s what.  Be kind to all those women in high heels and those poor blades of grass growing in the danger zone, and rent a dance floor for guests to use in lieu of just a grassy area or even a patio or deck.  You’ll want something flat and smooth.

Light it up.

A huge perk of a backyard wedding is that you can light up this space with as many (or as few) beautiful strands of lights as you could possible want—and you can begin the stringing as early as you need to since no one else is renting your event space.  We suggest stringing lights throughout the ceiling of the tent and wrapping them around trees.  Consider hanging or placing even more lights, Chinese lanterns and candles on chairs, tables, trees and other natural shrubbery.  Wedding lighting is worth the upgrade almost every time.  Take a look at these photos.  What would they look like without such exquisite lighting?

Rent it.

Rent your tables and chairs from a rental company—or through your catering team, who will either rent the equipment themselves or know with whom you should speak for the best styles for your budget.  When you rent your equipment, you won’t have to worry about the setup or take down.  You just show up, sign on the dotted line and the entire reception will be constructed for you.

Huge tip: you will not regret this help on your wedding day.  Also worth considering is the temperature.  Are you hosting your wedding on the hottest day of the year?  Consider renting equipment that will help cool down your guests so that no one gets too hot and uncomfortable.  If you’re hosting a late fall backyard wedding and the evenings are known to cool down, there are plenty of attractive looking heater options you can also rent from your rental company.  Another big tip: temperature controlling equipment is always a good idea.

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The Ultimate Guide To Choosing An Event Videographer

How To Film an Event

How you film an event can either make or break that event. If we watch closely events like those organized by TEDx, we will realize that these events are not shot haphazardly, but are directed in various ways to really embrace the nature of the speech given, the speaker’s expressions, as well as the audience’s reactions. The same goes for entertainment events, sports events, etc

Write a Plan

Shooting an event can get really tricky. There’s usually something that’s the center of the event, whether it’s a performance, a speech, a prize-giving, etc, as well as the audience or crowd, and the atmosphere of the event. Each of these elements has to be included in the plan with the right balance so as not to waste any of your assets.

Keys to A Successful Event Video

One of the keys to success in capturing an event on video is the formation of the right crew for this particular event. A director, cameraman, or sound engineer might be great at their job and highly qualified, but nothing works without them having the right specialty. Just like a heart surgeon would not perform plastic surgery, you have to make sure the team you pick for your sports event is specialized in such events, which would substantially differ for example from a conference on astronomy.

Live Event Camera Set-up

The first thing you have to make sure is available while shooting your event is the variety of angles. Whether you are using one camera or more, you need to make sure the organizers take into account this issue while setting up the stage or the hall where the event is taking place. Also, if there are seats for the audience, it would serve you best to secure a seat in middle for front shots.

Camera Positioning

When you position the camera, you have to know what your limitations are. If you’re only using one camera, keep it close to the stage, because if you’re only shooting the event from one spot, it should obviously be focused mainly on the main performance. However, if this is the case, then you should at least manage to get a sliding deck so that you can move smoothly from one angle to another without causing any disturbance to the video or any rigid movement

 

Videography Tips

Shooting documentaries is part technique and part instinct. Depending on the type of documentary you’re shooting, you may have to shoot on the fly “following the action” or everything may already be planned out in advance — for example a historical documentary where you’re shooting a lot of “talking head” interviews.

Steady Eddie – Keep the camera steady. If possible, use a tripod. Don’t constantly zoom in & out or pan right to left. In general, you want to record at least :10 of each shot. Let the action in the frame speak for itself. You will thank yourself once you’re back in the editing room

Wide, Medium, Close-up – For every scene or event you’re shooting, make sure to get different angles so that you’ll have choices in the editing process. For example, if you’re videotaping a protest, get the widest angle possible (perhaps on top of a building looking down on the crowd), then get close-ups of the faces in the crowd and then some medium shots of people from the ground level. Again, don’t forget the :10 rule for recording each shot.

What’s in the background? – When you’re shooting an interview or a speech, make sure to notice what’s in the background. You can either move the camera to get the best angle, move the subject in front of a good background or create a new background. Ask yourself, does this background “support” this story visually?” Is it a good backdrop for what is being discussed?

Timelapse – time-lapse is one of the most visual and fun ways to capture an event or story. Before heading out for a shoot, think about whether the story could lend itself to a time-lapse shot. Various video cameras these days are equipped with special time-lapse settings. If they’re not, just set the camera up on a tripod and let it roll. You can always speed up the footage in editing later

 

Reasons Why Your Corporate Event Needs a Videographer

If you’ve got a corporate event coming up, you’ll want to capture it with a corporate event video, there’s no question about that. Event video coverage is a great way to build brand awareness for your company and get people interested in and excited about what you do

After looking at event videography rates, you might be tempted to try to figure out how to film an event yourself. Videography is like photography, writing and other pursuits, in that everybody can do it, but it takes specialized skill to do it well.

A Professional Corporate Event Video Reflects on Your Company

People who are watching your corporate event video aren’t just learning about who your company is and what your company does. They’re also learning about your commitment to quality.

A Professional Videographer Stays Out of the Way

A professional videographer knows how to film (by film people might think we are actually using film instead of digital 4k for the event) an event unobtrusively, allowing activities to continue uninterrupted.

A Professional Videographer Knows How to Edit

Videoing your corporate event is about more than just filming, it’s knowing how to cut the event together, how to mix the shots and the sound, and add music and any subtle effects or graphics that will make the video really shine without appearing overproduced.

 

Tips for Finding Your Niche as a Videographer

Ten years ago, I had no idea that freelance graphic design and a strong interest in documenting travel, waves and concerts would ultimately lead to a fun and rewarding video production business. And I’m not flying across the world shooting surf documentaries (maybe next year), but instead, I’m growing a sustainable video business that could eventually take me there.

Don’t Rush the Process.

Trust and believe that finding your niche will happen organically.  The saying, “An overnight success takes 10 years,” definitely applies here. A passion for creative work led me ultimately to realize that I enjoy being in the field, directing, shooting and producing videos.

Make Opportunities to Build Your Portfolio

Early in your video career you have to take (or even make) opportunities! Experience in the field is priceless and sometimes you have to get it where you can. For me, this meant working with friends for little or no money while I learned the craft and slowly built up funds for better equipment

Embrace Failure.

You will botch jobs. You will miss critical shots. You will lose footage and audio and experience heart-stopping gear catastrophes

Work with Others.

There’s no denying the power of collaboration. Just being around and talking with other videographers is invaluable to finding your niche. Through conversations about gear, workflow, camera settings and clients you can learn an incredible amount in a single afternoon

 

The best Canon cameras for wedding videography – three pros reveal what they use

Weddings are big business, with couples now spending more money than ever on their special day – including, increasingly, hiring a professional wedding videographer to record the day’s events, alongside a stills photographer

“We’ve seen an increase in the number of couples recognising that both creative formats offer something beautifully different to enable them to remember their wedding day,” says photographer and videographer Andy Mac. “In our business, we’re helping preserve precious memories of a deeply important, emotional moment in people’s lives with the people they cherish most around them.”

While still photographs record the event in their own unique way, wedding videos offer another dimension, and Andy enjoys shooting them. “I love the storytelling abilities that video allows,” he says. “The context of a moment, movement, sound, music, time, tempo – all these factors provide something a little different to what [still] photography provides.”

DSLR: Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

British wedding photographer and videographer Andy Mac started out as a stills photographer, shooting commercially before he began specialising in weddings. He provides a luxury wedding stills and video service through his company Andy Mac Photography & Filming, for clients including celebrities and royalty.

Full-frame mirrorless: Canon EOS R

Leipzig-based Canon Ambassadors Julia Blumenthal and Gil Gropengiesser are destination wedding photographers and videographers who like to work in a natural and spontaneous way

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Find The Best Wedding Dj

TIPS TO FINDING THE RIGHT WEDDING DJ

Don’t automatically go with someone you know. You may have a cousin, friend, or acquaintance who is a DJ, so you feel like you should choose them for your wedding. Maybe you should and maybe you should not; let their qualifications, not your relationship, be the determining factor. If you do choose to go with someone you know, don’t keep things casual- make sure that you are in a contract that specifically spells out your obligations and theirs!

Check with the venue. Does your venue have a preferred DJ? If so, that DJ probably knows the venues acoustics and any special concerns. You might not decide to go with that DJ, but their preferred DJ should be on your interview list.

Ask for referrals. That friend whose reception was awesome? Ask her for her DJ’s name

Look at wedding forums for your area. Who do people recommend? Dig deeper than the star rating and actually read reviews to find out why people recommend a particular D

Make a short-list of DJs and interview them. If a DJ won’t make time for an interview, how likely is he or she to make time for you during the wedding planning.

 

Questions to Ask Before Booking Your DJ

Is this your full-time business? Are weddings your primary focus? What clubs, lounges, and corporate clients have you performed for in addition to weddings

Determine whether they are a well-rounded, successful entertainer who can bring a level of expertise and versatility to your event. “You want to ensure that your DJ isn’t a one-dimensional part-timer, but a true performer whose had varied and extensive experience performing in front of different (and tough) audiences,” said DJ Kev Sakoda. It’s fine if your prospective DJ mainly focuses on weddings—DJ Vito Namio performs at well over 100 per year—as long as they squeeze in some time for other types of parties as well.

How do you customize the music experience for each couple? Can you help with song lists and providing suggestions

Find a DJ who will create a soundtrack for your wedding that is based on your style, taste, and vision for that day. “One size does not fit all—if your desire is to have a mosh pit at your wedding, then you will need to deliver that and anything else you want, for that matter,” said Sakoda.

How do you get the crowd pumped

There are all kinds of incentives that DJs use to encourage guests to storm the dance floor, whether it’s asking couples to join the newlyweds for a good-luck dance or playing a meaningful throwback song from the bridesmaids’ college days. Ask them how to get the crowd pumped, but, more importantly, listen to their music demos or watch wedding performances to get a sense of how they will interact with your guests in person. Interviewing prospective DJs is certainly helpful, but hearing them in action will really seal the deal.

How do you handle song requests

“There could be instances where the client directives are diametrically opposed to the guest requests. How a DJ strikes a balance to deliver on the couple’s desires—while still satisfying the guests’ requests—determines the skill and experience of the DJ,” said Sakoda.

Can I hear some examples of mixing and blending different tracks

When mixing is done correctly, you probably aren’t even aware of it. The DJ should be able to blend between songs seamlessly; you don’t want guests to become bored by a ten-minute long Queen rendition! However, when this technique is performed incorrectly, you’ll be able to discern it instantly: “When there is no mixing or blending, there is awkward silence between songs (it’s the same thing as your iPod),” said Sakoda.

 

Expert Tips on Finding the Perfect Wedding DJ

How does my DJ choice affect the overall environment of an event

The quality of the DJ makes a big difference in the outcome of the wedding event because music inspires the energy of the guests. From the ceremony music to cocktail hour and the reception, the music will change with the environment. Having a professional person who is equipped with the appropriate equipment and confidence to lead the crowd is key. DJs don’t just mix music, they MC an event and keep it flowing. They need to adhere to a timeline, be without an ego, and love what they do so much that they do it full time.

Why is there such a big difference pricing

One DJ may be $300 and the other $1,300. Can you explain? There are no barriers to entry when it comes to wedding services: photographers, DJs, video – you name it. Anyone can pick up some equipment, come up with a catchy name, and then start promoting. So pricing is all over the board. It all comes down to the DJ’s time commitment to their craft and size of their organization. A reputable DJ company employing several team members equipped with backup plans is going to be a bigger investment, but the security you get with spending more is worth the headache you get when your part-time person bails.

Consider the following

Does your potential vendor have liability insurance? (Many venues now require this). How about a business license? A professional website? How fast is the response time? All of these things require investment on behalf of the DJ. If the possible DJ is offering you a price point under $1,000 for a wedding reception on a Saturday, make sure you get a contract which states what happens if they cancel. You would be amazed how many brides frantically call us 30 days before their wedding because the DJ they booked cancelled or worse yet – just disappeared! They end up losing the money they paid for the “Good Deal” DJ, and worse, may not have a DJ at all

Are all DJs created equally

No. Experience and attitude make all the difference. A reputable wedding DJ will have a great website complete with digital mixes of their work and maybe even video footage from their events so you can see what their style is like. Do your research.

Do we get to determine a playlist with you or will you customize music based on our preferences

Our tagline includes “your style, your taste, your vision” and we mean it. Everything is designed to match your style, including how you provide music options. Some brides will give us a few songs suggestions and some will give us 4+ hours of music for 2 hours of actual dancing time at a reception. It is really whatever you as a bride would like to do

 

Tips to Finding the Best Wedding DJ

Radio DJs

We all hear them on our local radio station. In most cases they are very professional and easy to work with. Often they have a local celebrity status, have great microphone skills to handle announcements, and current trends in music. The biggest problem – not all DJs are the kind that can play for a party. Radio is standardized, and is typically pre-recorded in order to add commercials and radio plugs.

Mobile DJs

These DJs are the most common among the culture.  Typically working full- or part-time, doing what they love the most. It’s important to understand that not all mobile DJs are the same and they certainly aren’t all good. Experience is valuable when looking for a mobile Dj and most will be able to provide you with customer reviews as well as promotional materials (Videos (youtube – Vimeo,) Pics, and documentation) showing off their skills. The mobile DJ world is eager to book a gig so much so that there are DJs willing to do a wedding for $500 or less. This may sound like a great deal and I’m sure some of them can provide a satisfactory experience, but most of the time they are priced low to take gigs away from professional DJs and often leaving a bad reputation in the DJ industry. This is why its important to do your research on a potential DJ so your big day won’t go sour. A lot of DJs will tell you what you want to hear to get the gig, but not all of them can deliver. Google, Facebook, Instagram, and personal interaction are the best tools for making your decision.

Club DJs

Usually stand out in most cities as the best and sought after for special events. They are usually current with today’s hits, have exceptional mixing skills, and usually a residency at one or more venues. This experience often comes with a higher price tag, but tend to be lacking in crowd interaction due to an over-inflated ego and proper training in the wedding industry. They might be an incredibly talented DJ who is amazing to witness live but will they be a good choice for the reception on your big day?

Turntablist

his is a dying breed of DJs. In 1943 Jimmy_Savile launched the world’s first DJ dance party. Throughout the 40’s and 50’s artist began sampling tracks to create new music. In 1975, Grand Wizzard Theodore invent the technique of scratching. Throughout the 80’s and 90’s beat juggling, aligning beats, and effects to create new songs. These typically aren’t the DJs you’d want for a wedding reception but they are fun to watch.

Music Producers / Superstar DJs

These two are unlikely to perform at your wedding or special event. With price tags in the 10 of thousands of dollars and extensive touring schedule its almost impossible to hire this type of DJ unless your a celebrity yourself.

 

TOP TIPS FOR HIRING YOUR WEDDING DJ FOR YOUR BIG DAY

Don’t feel obliged to use the ‘in-house’ disco at your wedding venue. Some venues offer this in their package but that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the best DJ for the job. Shop around! Look for recommendations, or maybe phone a past client. Check the DJ’s website if they have one, if it looks unprofessional, chances are, their performance could be unprofessional, too.

Arrange a meeting with the DJ before booking them and again before your wedding day. As well as gauging their appearance, you’ll be able to see if you ‘get on’. Ask the DJ for their advice on when to have the first dance, buffet and so on, and remember you’ll need to allow about 90 minutes for the disco to set up.

Try to avoid being ‘too cool for school’ and remember it’s a party for your guests, too! The best wedding DJs are booked up well in advance so make sure you check availability and book early – don’t risk leaving it until the last minute.

Do you need wireless mics for speeches or special lights? Make sure you get these extras included in any quotes. Use your budget wisely. Good wedding DJs may cost a little extra but will make the entertainment more memorable.

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Consultation With Event Planner To Make Your Event Goes Well

What Exactly Does an Event Planner Do? You’d Be Surprised

What exactly does an event planner do?

It’s an event planner’s job to ensure everything related to an event is taken care of, from idea conception to programming and day-of logistics. An event planner is charged with creating experiences and bringing visions to life, which means stirring multiple pots.

Meeting with clients, scouting locations, soliciting bids, managing vendor relationships and client communications, establishing and negotiating contracts, and managing budgets are all part of the drill, as are setting and managing clients’ and vendors’ expectations. It’s not always for the faint of heart

 

Some Desirable Characteristics Of An Event Planner Include:

  1. Communication

Good communication is necessary to convince a prospective client to hire you. Both verbal and writing skills are of utmost importance to enable you to successfully get that client. Good writing skills come in handy for writing a proposal, as well as a good command of English to enable you to convey to your client why you are the right person for the job.

  1. Financial Management

This has to do with creating the event to be in line with your client’s budget while taking care to ensure that the client is satisfied with your services. You have to be able to do the math as an event planner and work within the budget.

  1. Negotiation Skills

This has to do with the ability to “cut-a-deal” while taking into consideration the client’s needs as regards the details. Working with many suppliers will make it necessary for you to be on top of your game when it comes to reaching a compromise that will make everyone happy.

  1. Decision-Making Skills

For an event planner there are no ifs, buts or maybes, it’s either a strong yes or no. You have to be sure that you know, and are ready to make decisions which will give the event that spectacular effect according to the client’s taste.

  1. Leadership

As an event planner, relationships with people are key. You will be working with people on your team, individual suppliers and others. You have to know how to make people enjoy working with you, thus you need to know how to relate with people on various levels. As a leader you have to inspire your team to put in their best by setting a good example so as to bring out the best in your team.

  1. Organizational Skills

Events are all about getting things done the right way (detail-wise), and at the right time (which of course is before the event), and for this to happen you have to be on your “A-game” when it comes to organizing. This can only be possible if you are really good at prioritizing your workload efficiently to ensure that at the end of the

 

The purpose of your event

Why are you holding an event? You’d be surprised how many people think an event is a wonderful idea but when pressed on what the purpose of the event is, or its overall goal, they are unable to clearly articulate its objective. You want to make certain there is a clear mission and business reason to hold an event — a celebration for a new facility, a fundraising event with a clear financial goal behind it, a new product launch to share with customers — lacking a defined objective, your event can be a costly effort without the power to attract attendees or further your mission.

 

They’re good under pressure

Event planners are great at keeping calm under pressure. In stressful situations, they are able to find a solution and stay level-headed, no matter what. Since they’re used to people coming to them for answers, they’re able to think quick on their feet.

 

What Should You Do About The Contract?

Now, if your business – like most – is hiring an event planner on a contractual basis, then there’s a good chance you’ll be given a few papers to sign.

See, most event management firms have clients sign some sort of contract before they agree to work with them (and you should take it as a red flag if the planner or firm you’re hiring doesn’t have one). Pay close attention to whatever you’re being made to sign, and make absolutely certain that you read the fine print. Seek out a legal professional to go over the details with you – the event planner in question likely won’t take offense unless they’re trying to pull a fast one on you.

While you’re at it, make sure you’ve a clear concept of all the fees and terms of your working relationship with your event planner up front. Nothing makes a partnership go sour faster than having to pay a fee you weren’t aware of, or finding out a huge percentage of the profits will be siphoned away from your business. It’s all about due diligence here, really.

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